Monday, September 23, 2013

Bibliophile's Corner

The Lightning Dreamer
by Margarita Engle

Amazon Description:
"I find it so easy to forget / that I'm just a girl who is expected / to live / without thoughts." Opposing slavery in Cuba in the nineteenth century was dangerous. The most daring abolitionists were poets who veiled their work in metaphor. Of these, the boldest was Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, nicknamed Tula.

In passionate, accessible verses of her own, Engle evokes the voice of this book-loving feminist and abolitionist who bravely resisted an arranged marriage at the age of fourteen, and was ultimately courageous enough to fight against injustice. Historical notes, excerpts, and source notes round out this exceptional tribute.

My Thoughts:
Margarita Engle educates the reader not only on the life of famed poet, Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, she also enlightens the reader to the travesty of slavery in Cuba during the nineteenth century. This well-written novel in verse is packed with poignant and passionate prose - another great example of the talent of Margarita Engle. I would highly recommend The Lightning Dreamer to female readers from the ages of ten and up, and to anyone who enjoys history or poetry.

To learn more about Margarita Engle, click here: http://margaritaengle.com/

8 comments:

  1. Great review. Most people in this country tend to think of slavery as primarily taking place in the United States during the 19th century, but unfortunately, it was pervasive in many parts of the world. The Lightning Dreamer is an excellent and poignant way of bringing this sensitive topic to young readers.

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    1. Margarita Engle is one of my favorite authors. Her lyrical writing and insightful stories are just amazing. Have a good week, Brandi!

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  2. This book sound good. Thanks for the review. Brandi is right, it is a sensitive topic for young readers. I'm glad that there are writers out there who aren't afraid to tackle such a delicate subject and bring it into the light.

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    1. I agree, Loree. When sensitive topics, such as slavery, are written into a children's novel in a age-appropriate manner, the young reader is not only entertained, but educated.

      Have a great week!

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  3. I bet this is one case where one can indeed judge a book by it's cover....because that is a wonderful cover.

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    1. I agree, Celeste. You are indeed a good judge of cover art since you are such a wonderful artist!

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  4. This sounds like a great story! I've read a few of Margarita's books but somehow missed this one. Thanks for sharing =)

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