Friday, July 20, 2012

Storyteller's Journey

   
       Looking for Literature

lit - er - a - ture: written works with artistic value: written works, e.g. fiction, poetry, drama, and criticism, that are recognized as having permanent artistic value.


Being around my husband, Michael, as he daily works on his lovely impressionistic paintings, I am constantly reminded that art is a creation. It is not a set of rules to fulfill that magically make the painter's creation art. Michael does not have a degree in fine art, and yet, he is represented by a well-established art gallery. He has friends who do have their M.F.A. - and have been painting for years - and still are not represented by a gallery. The director of Michael's art gallery told him that his paintings are fresh, and different, and that he just likes working with Michael. My husband maintains his own blog with this quote in the header: Where the spirit does not work with the hand there is no art. Leonardo da Vinci.

As I have been looking to improve the quality of my manuscript with colorful characters, better tension, and so on - I have remembered why I began writing in the first place: the love of a story.
I read books almost everyday that I love and enjoy; many of them contain a few adverbs, an occasional rambling, or other minor written misdemeanors. Sometimes those usually forbidden items actually add to my enjoyment. Why is that? I believe it's because I am seeing a bit of what the writer wanted to say, rather than what they thought they were supposed to say. It's just another reminder that as writer, I'm not only looking for a technically perfect text...I am looking, and hoping, for literature.

14 comments:

  1. Congrats to Michael! My dad painted impressionistic paintings. He sold many in shows, and has some hanging is a few schools and libraries.

    You are so right. As writers, in our art, we are looking for literature.

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    1. Thanks, Loree. I am busy revising now, I think I needed to pep myself up!

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  2. Absolutely love...this...post. You have no idea how much you have inspired me today. Thank you, Victoria.

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    1. Thanks, Linda. I am so glad you found this post inspiring; you have inspired me numerous times, girlfriend!

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  3. So called forbidden items can be added without fear as the rules are made to be broken when the art demands it.

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    1. Thanks Martin. I recently finished the MG book, DarkIsle, by D.A. Nelson - she is a wonderful author from Scotland. In her book she used a scattering of adverbs. I noticed that when she did it actually added to the text quite nicely. I agree with you!

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  4. I think it's wonderful that you and your husband are an artistic, creative couple :-) Congratulations to him on being represented in an art gallery.

    The beauty of reading books is in the unique turning of phrases. Literature is indeed an artform. Have a great weekend!

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  5. What a great post, Victoria. We all need to find that balance between originality and following form. Not easy, to be sure.
    And now I'm clicking over to check out your husbands site =)

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    1. I really appreciate your supportive comments, Ruth. Have a wonderful weekend.

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  6. I love impressionism. Love the comparison of making art with words.

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    1. Thanks, Theresa. Living with an oil painter I have lots of opportunities to do just that! Take care ~

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  7. FYI. I referenced this post on my blog today. :)

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  8. I liked this post so much! Actually, I've gone back and read some of the classics, and the writing is so vivid and the stories so strong, and they're full of adjectives, adverbs, narrative, etc. All the "no-no's". Maybe over time, contemporary writing rules will relax a little. A good story is a good story!

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